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How Much Does The Average Freight Broker Earn?

How much do freight brokers earn? We get this question all the time. Nate Cross tackles the ever so popular question and reviews how a broker’s income varies based on a variety of factors.

3 Tips to Becoming a Freight Agency Owner

Running your own business can sound like a daunting task. But with LDI, you can launch a freight agency and start brokering freight for your loyal customers within hours.

Why LDI? From Golf Pro to Logistics Pro

Before signing with LDI, Jeremy looked at 30 freight agent programs. He partnered with a 3PL that he knew would help him achieve success.

How Freight Brokers Diversify Their Book of Business

Your book of business is your lifeline. In other words, the more robust your customer base, the stronger your business continuity. At LDI, we talk a lot about your book of business’s health, and that means evaluating all those customers.

LDI Presents The Midnight Freight Broker Podcast

LDI is dedicated to our agents and their success! Now we’re delivering the best information straight to your podcast app every week, whether you’re one of our agents or not.

Do This Before You Launch Your Own Freight Brokerage

Interested in becoming a freight broker? Before you jump into brokering freight, brokers and other industry experts agree these are the must-do tasks before you set out on your own.

How To Find Shipping Customers

Finding new shipping customers is not easy, we know. With you in mind, we put together this post for some ideas on how you can grow your book of business!

How to Guarantee Profits (Without Really Trying)

If there’s one question we hear from our freight broker agents time and again, it’s “how can I get my profits up?” It’s a good question, and we’re here to provide some resources to help out.

Being a freight brokerage business owner means you’re always learning new ways you could run your business. Not to be confused with implementing each and every new entrepreneurial method into your business; there’s not one perfect way to run a business. But there are really good ideas and tricks out there by others who succeeded in the startup phase, who are willing to share those ideas and tricks, and some of those are worth testing. This is one of them.

Mike Michalowicz was recommended to me years ago. You might not recognize the name, but you’ve probably heard of the book The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur. That book has been mentioned by (what feels like) dozens of entrepreneurs as their favorite helpful book on the Entrepreneur on Fire podcast. That book might be Michalowicz’s most popular work, but his most famous piece should be Profit First.

If you’re an established freight broker, skip The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur. If you’re looking to improve the profit margins in your established business, Profit First should be at the top of your reading list. Much like Dave Ramsey is the mastermind behind The Total Money Makeover (also recommended by Michalowicz for personal finance management, and I personally endorse it, too), Mike Michalowicz just gets how to run a financially healthy business.

Mike Michalowicz repeatedly gives this same advice over and over: it’s not about being cheap; it’s about being frugal. Cheap doesn’t get us anywhere—we can make bad purchasing decisions trying to be cheap. Being frugal assures we’re investing our valuable operating expenses exactly where they need to be to benefit the business and your profits.


Want to learn how LDI can help you increase profits today? Let’s talk.


How To Make a Profit…

According to the book, the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles formula for determining a business’s profit is:

Sales – Expenses = Profit

Michalowicz saw (and personally experienced) that this method has the potential to ruin entrepreneurs.

There’s this thing called Parkinson’s Law. It’s technically a book written by C. Northcote Parkinson, but generally speaking, it’s his theory that a demand for a resource will increase to meet the available supply—“work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion”. If we have 2 weeks to do a project, it’ll take 2 weeks. If we have 8 weeks, it’ll take 8. Michalowicz takes this even further: if we have $1,000 to do something, it will cost $1,000.  But if we only have $800 to do something, we’ll find a way to get it done with just $800. The best way to accomplish this is to reduce the supply for our demand to require.

…Without Really Trying

The Profit First Formula to determine business profits is:

Sales – Profit = Expenses

While the entire book is worth the investment and read, here’s a breakdown of how your business can bring in profit every month according to the Profit First Method:

Set Up Multiple Bank Accounts

Much like how you’ve set up a personal checking account and personal savings account, do this for your business as well. Have 3 checking accounts, as some banks might penalize you for withdrawing from saving accounts as often as you will need to touch each one of these accounts. The accounts are nicknamed Income, Owner’s Pay, and Operating Expenses (OpEx).

All revenue will be deposited directly into the Income account.

Next, you’ll have to do something you might not have expected. To avoid the temptation of touching some money altogether, Michalowicz recommends opening two savings accounts at a completely different banks. These accounts are nicknamed Profit and Taxes.

Establish Your Target Allocation Percentages (TAPs)

Now to allocate funds to each of those accounts. Rather than choosing based on monetary numbers, which is probably our first instinct, base allocations on percentages. A recommended TAPs chart is available on Michalowicz’s website, and we’ll use those numbers here.

(But your business might not be in any shape to immediately contribute 5% of the total revenue to the Profit account, what then? That’s where the book will come in handy, as he has an entire section with other numbers and examples of businesses who had to take painful baby steps to get to this point.)

For now, we’ll use the publically available recommended TAPs for this example:

As mentioned before, all revenue goes into the Income checking account.

Regardless of how much your firm makes, the recommended allocation for Taxes is 15 percent across the board. Talk to your accountant to make certain you’re square with taxes, just to be certain.

A Word About Taxes

Setting up a Taxes account and regularly allocating funds to it is crucial—particularly for our agents. Since LDI does not withhold taxes when we pay our agents, every freight broker should be setting aside some revenue for the government come tax time. Tax allocation escapes many entrepreneurs and self-employed contractors attention throughout the year, and panic sets in at tax time as there’s sometimes not enough money in the account to pay the government. Implementing this step alone has turned a lot of business owner’s lives around for the better! So, no matter what allocations you follow below, absolutely prioritize the 15 percent (or what your accountant tells you) to a savings account for taxes.

Back to TAPs

For the remaining percentages, say your freight brokerage firm brings in less than $250,000/year. Twice a month, from your Income account, send 50 percent to Owner’s Pay, 30 percent to OpEx, and then 5 percent to the Profit savings account at the other bank.

If your freight company makes between a quarter to half a million in yearly revenue, the TAPs move to 35 percent Owner’s Pay, 40 percent OpEx, and 10 percent Profit.

Regularly hitting between half a million and a million in yearly revenue? Those percentages switch again to 20 percent Owner’s Pay, 50 percent OpEx, and 15 percent Profit.

Next Steps

See what’s happening here? When you see all the revenue come into the Income account and accumulate, you get excited! Look at all that cash! We have an emotional reaction to those numbers.

Then, twice a month (Michalowicz recommends predetermined days practically written in stone), distribute those funds to the other accounts. Twice a month on the exact same days, you’ll send those allocated percentages into your other accounts.

All bills and expenses are going to come out of the OpEx checking account. When an expense comes up that you “need,” look at the OpEx account, not your Income account. The only money moving out of your Income account is going directly into other accounts.

Here Parkinson’s Law goes into play—you’ve shrunk the available funds for operating expenses. There’s not an arbitrary number to play with anymore, there’s only 30 (or 40 or 50) percent of your total revenue to work with. You’ll now find alternative ways to accomplish the ends, or you’ll realize you didn’t need that expense anyways.

Disclaimer

Now, this is a severely watered down Reader’s Digest version of how to allocate funds. I’m leaving out a lot. For the actual step-by-step process of how to make these TAPs work for you, check out this Profit First Overview available from Michalowicz’s website. Confused as to how to use it? All the info is in the book.

Also, I’m basing this entire write up on the first edition of the audiobook. A second, new and improved edition has been released since I downloaded it from Audible. The second edition is possibly even better and more helpful, so that could be worth checking out! If you read the second edition and the info is a little different, that’s probably why.

And Now You Have Profits Without Really Trying

Hope this brief overview to Profit First has given you enough information to know if you want to purchase it for yourself! The book is engaging, inspiring, and short. The audiobook is narrated by Mike himself, and he loves to go off on side stories about personal experiences and gives extra examples in the moment (you’ll know when this happens because he’ll finish with, “Ok, back to the book”). It’s almost like a podcast rather than an audiobook, which is fun.

For more pointers on how to effectively run your freight brokerage, and tips to help increase your profits, contact our LDI business developers at 1-800-554-3734.

freight agent program - logistic dynamics

How Top Freight Brokers Leverage Facebook to Grow Their Business

Recently, I had the opportunity of getting a little face-time with one of LDi’s top freight broker agents. During our conversation, he shared with me his struggles on building his presence on social media and with Facebook in particular. His main concern at the time was how he could grow his Facebook freight broker business page fan base. As LDi’s Marketing Manager, I was more than happy to share with him my social media expertise and offer in-depth insight and suggestions that he found to be valuable. It was then that it occurred to me that this information, as simple as it seemed to me with my background, was not so obvious to him and that it could be beneficial to ALL freight broker agents facing this very same struggle.

I’ll admit that this article might seem like a departure from more “traditional” methods for growing a freight broker business such as: turning cold calls into warm calls, finding new customers or retaining current ones, etc. But, I assure you that social media, once considered a novel alternative by businesses, is now a mainstream growth tool for your business and that you’re missing out on additional business opportunities if you are not fully embracing and exploring all avenues with regards to social media. To go a step further, if you have an established social media presence you may not be doing enough to truly reap the benefits that it offers. More specifically, I believe freight brokers should be utilizing Facebook equally if not more so than LinkedIn to grow their freight broker business and here’s my thoughts on why:  first, in the professional world, the general consensus is that LinkedIn is the ‘god of prospecting and connecting’ when it comes to businesses or business professionals…when the truth is that sales and growing your business is a numbers game and numbers are all about reach and exposure. And if you’re talking reach and exposure, no other social media network even comes close to Facebook. For those of you, and I’m sure there’s quite a few, that are saying, “But Facebook is a SOCIAL network!” That’s absolutely true. But, the number of people that are on Facebook and using it daily are astounding! Whereas on LinkedIn, very much considered the powerhouse of lead generation, user numbers are considerably less and they are not on LinkedIn daily. And, now I can hear those same individuals saying, “But we need to connect with businesses”. Also true. But we don’t sell to a business – we sell to a person.

My second reason, is any individual looking to sell a product or offer a service can’t ignore the TRUE determinant of why prospects become customers and customers stay loyal to you…and that’s RELATIONSHIPS. And I’m not talking about a ‘business relationship’ where you call, they have a need and you deliver a solution. That’s just logistics and if that’s your only approach you’ll spend more time trying to drum up new business and the rest of the time wondering why you can’t keep your customers. I’m talking about a personal relationship where you have put in the effort since day one with them. Getting to know your prospect/customer as a person, relating to their concerns, building trust and deepening that connection to the point where they aren’t just a business contact anymore – they are now a loyal customer that trusts your word, depends on you to service their needs and would not even consider sending their business elsewhere. There will even be days, once that level of comfort is firmly established, that your customer will give you a quick call, state their need and know you’ll just ‘handle it’. But chances are you also know their favorite hobby, if they’re married, have children or just bought a new house – all because you’ve built a personal relationship with them. And what social network is known, used for and deemed appropriate for building personal relationships and connecting on a personal level? That’s right – FACEBOOK!

FACTS:

  • More than 467 million people use LinkedIn BUT there are more than 1.6 BILLION users on Facebook DAILY!
  • More than 3 people sign up every second on LinkedIn BUT more than 8 people per second are added on Facebook!
  • An average user spends 17 minutes on LinkedIn per month BUT an average user spends 21 minutes on Facebook a DAY!

That’s impressive! Now that I’ve addressed the why and offered some facts, I’d like to share how a freight broker can begin leveraging Facebook as a POWERFUL tool to grow their business* even if they just created a Facebook business page TODAY! For those of you that have already been working with your Facebook business page, I’m confident that even you will benefit from some of these suggestions, keeping in mind I’m assuming nothing of your social networking abilities or depth in your current progress, so I’m starting with the basics:

  1. Create a Facebook business page
    1. Obviously! This is easily done from your personal page by looking to the upper right corner of your screen and clicking on the white downward arrow. In the drop down menu, select ‘Create Page’.
  2. Optimize your Facebook business page
    1. It’s important that BEFORE you decide to just create a business page for yourself that you research other users on Facebook, similar to you, that have created a business page and that you take the time to carefully review all the elements that went into their page (banner image, photos, bio, videos, everything). It’s always best to emulate the best instead of winging it or starting from scratch.
  3. Link your Facebook business page to your personal profile
    1. This is a great way to alert your personal contacts that you have a business page and hopefully drive them there and Like your business page. The more connections the better and those connections will hopefully help to share your business page content that could mean the potential for new or more business opportunities.
    2. To do this, start from your personal page and look on the left-hand side under ‘Intro’. Click on edit and start typing in the name of your business page. When you see it pop up, click on it to add it. Now it has become a link that people visiting your personal page can click on that will take them directly to your business page!
  4. Put a Facebook Fan Box on your website/blog
    1. Now that you’ve made your FB business page, don’t stop there! You need to promote your page every chance you get – be it on your website, in your blog, at your place of business, on your company literature, etc. Spread the word, again, it’s all about REACH and EXPOSURE.
  5. Take advantage of your personal Facebook account
    1. Whatever you post on your business page, you can also post on your personal page – that’s the beauty of Facebook and its lenient nature and flexibility.
  6. Content is KING
    1. Even if this is Facebook and interaction is very social and laid back, you should always post with being mindful to the “Big R’s” of social media:
      • Relative: relative refers to the content you are posting for your audience. ALWAYS think of your target audience FIRST before you post anything! You wouldn’t post a smoothie recipe on a jewelry store page. SPEAK to your SPECIFIC audience. Your Fans should find your page informative, helpful, interesting and appealing. Remember that this is your attempt at promoting your business side so you should project yourself as an expert, thought leader, educator and above all else, a professional.
      • Relevant: to attract and keep your Fans, you must post information that is always relevant. Keep topics current, keep your page fresh and you can even have fun with it by posting an industry article, a podcast of yours or (thanks to Facebook!) a funny meme about the transportation/logistics industry, etc. – and never, never, ever post anything questionable or offensive (I can’t stress this enough).
      • Reputable: whatever you post, that’s your image and whatever information you put out there, it needs to be accurate and easily verifiable.
      • Reciprocate: like any other social media network, content is shared. As much as you’d like your Fans to share your posts, you should make the same effort to regularly share some of your Fans posts as well. It can’t be a one-way street if you expect to continue having loyal Fans.
      • Responsive: Engagement is key. Just as you will invite comments and interaction from your Fans, you must make the effort to respond to their comments and stay constantly engaged with them. Answer questions, stay on top of your notifications, reply to comments and do it all in a timely manner! That’s just basic social media etiquette.
      • Results: Make sure to regularly check your Insights tab to gain valuable information/feedback on best time to post for your Fans, which of your efforts saw more engagement – was it a video? A meme? A posed question where they needed to select a response? An industry article? And harness that information to streamline your future efforts for better engagement by appealing more to your Fans.
  7. Post on Weekends
    1. With being the biggest social network out there, people aren’t just on it during work hours. They are on evenings AND weekends too! So, post anytime you want – if it’s good content (see #7).
  8. Invites, Likes and Fans
    1. Now that you’ve created a business page, you need FANS! Luckily there are SEVERAL ways to gain Likes:
      • Invite your friends from your personal page. Again, it’s all about reach and exposure and this one’s quick and easy.
      • From your personal page, join groups relative to your business page. For instance, freight brokers might search for groups using some of these words: truck, trucks, trucking, freight, freight broker, shipping, logistics and so on. Once you join or are accepted into some groups, you are now free to post content to their page. Make sure you don’t do anything to get yourself kicked from the group such as over-posting or bad content. The rule is, if you’re unsure – DON’T POST!
      • Make another established freight broker/trucking contact an admin to your business page. This is another quick and easy way to have access to their connections and invite them to your page as well!
  9. Create a Group
    1. Not only can you add Fans to a group by promoting it on your personal and business pages but others on FB will be searching for groups to join that they are interested in and join your group all on their own! How easy is that???
    2. Also, since you created the group, you set the tone for the page and content. This is the next best thing to prequalifying your prospects! Even though not all group members might be a hot prospect, at least they are more targeted and easily accessible to you.
  10. Check Yourself
    1. Just a word of warning as you venture into Facebook territory and begin marketing your professional self and your business. In the past, what might have been viewed as acceptable to your personal connections on your personal page (trash talk, slang, off color or inappropriate jokes/references, etc.) will now be potentially viewed and judged by anyone that connects to your business page. So, it might be wise to examine the content on your personal page (videos, posts, images, content) to make sure there is nothing that might offend or turn away potential prospects or current customers.

Let the above methods serve as a jumping off point for any freight broker looking to create a Facebook business page or have already done so but not sure how to proceed in optimizing it’s use. For those that found this information to be too basic and you’re looking to deepen your leveraging efforts with your Facebook business page even more, I invite you to obtain a copy of our free report, “Advanced Facebook Leveraging for Freight Brokers”.

If you have any additional suggestions on how to leverage a Facebook business page to help grow fan base and ultimately business opportunities, we’d love hear them! So, please feel free to comment on this or any of LDi’s blog posts or suggest future article topics and thanks for reading!

*Please keep in mind that this only serves as a general gauge and not all freight brokers will reach the same level of achievement, results or success when utilizing a Facebook business page to gain more customers or grow their business.